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. the president left washington today for the comparatively grownup environment of a room full of 4-year-olds. it went well. that's coming up. i was in the ambulance and i was told to call my next of kin. at 33 years old, i was having a heart attack. now i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. i didn't know this could happen so young. take control, talk to your doctor. prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonder what other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] did you just turn your ringer off so no one would interrupt and.us?one. oh no, i... just used my geico app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. all stations come over to mithis is for real this ti
in this constrained budget environment. we must help ensure dhs become a better stewart of tax dollars. recommendations by today's witnesses will help us better understand the issues that dhs faces and identify ways to help dhs improve. i look forward to their testimony. the chairman bomb that recognize the ranking member of the subcommittee, for any statement he may have. >> thank you mr. chairman. it is a pleasure to be here. i welcome witnesses and members of the subcommittee. i am looking for to working with the chairman and a bipartisan and productive manner as we conduct oversight in the department of homeland's security and other security functions. it is apparent, having met with the chairman at length, that we see eye to eye on many issues related to the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. i appreciate his collaboration as we move this important agenda for tweets this is our first subcommittee meeting at cannot think of a better issue to examine. the department of, security has one of the largest budget in the federal government. each year brings in $40 million in
this great nation. our soldiers today operate in a most uncertain and unpredictable environment. it is the most dynamic and unpredictable i have seen in my over 36 years of service. unlike post-conflict drawdowns, where we have a termination of conflict due to a police treaty or a political decline of a -- peavece trearty or a political decline of a superpower, instead today we have 81,000 soldiers deployed, including 50,000 fighting in afghanistan, and thousands of others in kuwait, in the horn of africa. over 91,000 soldiers are stationed in over 160 countries. we have been in a continuous state of war in the last 12 years, the longest in our history. but today, in my opinion, the greatest threat to our national security is the fiscal uncertainty resulting from a lack of predictability in the budget cycle, a series of continuing resolutions, a threat of sequestration hanging over our heads, our country's inability to put its fiscal house in order compromise is the full readiness of the joint force, army, and will impact our ability to provide our security to our nation. we hav
men have been told they are good at what they do especially in the male-dominated environment and encouraged to acquire different qualities. they are more self-deprecating but because politics is male-dominated women think they have to be twice as good but they use a different yardstick to gauge themselves. >> what about race? >> both sects and race are negative predictors so any kind of minority status to deviate from the norm, we see variation but political recruitment and close those gaps so if they encourage people to run for office they're likely to take them up especially among african-americans and latinos. >> host: professor, you give examples what is in example of somebody who developed an interest in policy and ran successfully? >> bill clinton is the most obvious. he writes out in the 16th year he decided it is an amazing experience because people are so interested to make a difference and me involved it is the most unfortunate experience but is exhilarating to not to want to do it again. >> host: tallis about your experience. where were you? what was the primary? >
environment is still a very difficult place to grow tools. radical. it's on the book shelves now. we'll have a little bit more with michelle
change last night. with so much on his plate, clean energy and the environment be so high on the list? is the president overstepping hi bounds on this issue? here with more on this, blue dog democrat congressman kurt schrader. welcome back to the show. what do you think about that idea? we have so many problems right now? you know we have this unemployment, so many people out of work. house being market, problems with small business. >> yep. melissa: there's a lot of things to work on. how did you feel about this being so high on the list? >> well, i'm glad it was further down in the speech and he led off with jobs and the economy and dealing with our fiscal deficit picture. but, i really bristle at the idea he will unilaterally as one member, one branch of government dictate to the other two branches more importantly dictate to the house and senate, that constitutionally you're supposed to make laws, new laws. that is not right and that is just not going to happen. melissa: do you think that will fly? this isn't the first time he talks about the executive order. this seems like a new
. it will need to be done in an environment where as we broaden the base, we both contribute to deficit reduction and hopefully are able to lower rates. on the business side, we have a contradiction in our fiscal tax system. our statutory rate is high. our effective rate is not as high. when you look at the united states against other countries, it the statutory rate makes the u.s. look unattractive compared to others. for individual firms, their average tax rate is much lower because of all of the complicated provisions that are part of the code now. it would be a challenge to take on those individual credit. there's no way way to bring the rate down. that is something i think we need to do to maintain competitiveness abroad. >> you still believe that going down the road we need to reduce that to get the rate down? >> i do. when one looks at a table of international tax rates, it stands up at u.s. statutory rate is high. it is a complicated story to tell that the average rate is lower. it does not affect all businesses equally. we need a simpler tax code. >> could you briefly comment on somethin
constrained environment. these challenges combined with these destabilizing effects of terrorist and critical networks will make general rodriquez' task at africom among the most complicated in the department. an additional matter in the africom aor is committee watches closely is the ongoing u.s. support operations in central africa to assist the multinational effort to remove joseph kony and his top lieutenants from the battlefield. this committee and general inhofe has been very active in this effort and assad to ensure that this mission is adequately resourced including additional intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. general rodriquez i know you are familiar with this mission and the committee looks forward to hearing from you about it and to working with you on it and so many of the other challenges he will be facing. i'm going to turn the gavel over to senator kaine who has agreed to take over because i must go to the floor and i i will call upon the senator inhofe. >> thank you mr. mr. mr. chair i join you in welcoming our witnesses. i've had an opportunity to get
places to be safer. in the short term, we can just decide to live in more urban environments. a wonderful study, you know, dick jackson famously asked the question in what sort of environment are you most likely to die in a pool of blood? that's how he puts it to his audiences. [laughter] and they compared murder by strangers, crime, to car crashes and added the two together. they looked at portland, vancouver and seattle in all three places, you were 15% safer in the grittiest inner city than the leafy suburbs because of the connell by nation of the two. -- combination of the two. and then finally asthma. who talk abouts about asthma? fourteen americans die every day from asthma. okay, that doesn't sound like a huge amount. it's three times the rate of the '90s and it's entirely due to motor exhaust. the sickest places in america are those places which are the most car dependent. and, you know, in phoenix you've got four months out of the year that healthy people are not supposed to leave their houses because of the amount of driving that's going on. so, again, what's the solution? the c
and this disparity indeed may grow in a resource constrained environment. these challenges combined with these destabilizing effects of terrorist and critical networks will make general rodriquez' task at africom among the most complicated in the department. an additional matter in the africom aor is committee watches osely is the ongoing u.s. support operationsin central africa to assist the multinational effort to remove joseph kony and his top lieutenants from the battlefield. this committee and general inhofe has been very active in this effort and assad to ensure that this mission is adequately resourced including additional intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. general rodriquez i know you are familiar with this mission and the committee looks forward to hearing from you about it and to working with you on it and so many of the other challenges he will be facing. i'm going to turn the gavel over to senator kaine who has agreed to take over because i must go to the floor and i i will call upon the senator inhofe. >> thank you mr. mr. mr. chair i join you in
to grow up in an environment like this, in a tough neighborhood, in a tough city. and i think that that is exactly why he's not here right now. i think this conversation is going on longer than anticipated, and the white house really said this was his main focus while he was here at the school was to talk to these young men, martin. >> okay. thank you so much, john yang. let's go back to mark glaze. mark, i just want to make the point for our viewers that john yang was just making, and i want to mention a few reports of deaths attributable to gun violence in the last 24 hours. a man outside dallas was shot and killed early this morning. an arkansas woman was killed in her apartment hour later. and on valentine's day a teenager in north carolina was killed while playing around with a shotgun with her brother. it would be wrong of us just to look at today and think that chicago is unique in some way. this is a nationwide problem, isn't it? >> and the point that our mayors make all of the time is that the public pays a lot of attention when there's a mass shooting because it's so
constrained environment. these challenges combined with a destabilizing impact such terrorist and criminal networks on a general rodriquez's tosk at africom among the most complicated in the department. an additional matter in the africom aor the committee watches closely as the ongoing support of u.s. operations in central africa to assist the multinational effort to remove joseph coney and top lieutenants in the battlefield. this committee and general inhofe has been very active in this effort and has sought to ensure the mission is adequate resource including additional intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. general rodriquez, i know that you are familiar with this mission and the committee looks forward to hearing from you about it and working with you on that and so many of the other challenges that you will be facing. i am going to turn the gavel over to senator kain has agreed to take over because i must close to the floor and i will call on senator inhofe. >> thank you mr. chair and i join you in welcoming the witnesses. i've had an opportunity to get to know th
is the ranking member of the arms services committee, member on the committee of environment and public works as well, and, senator, good to have you with us. you and senator reid, the majority leader, failing to come to terms on a whole, collins withdrawing her vote, and we have a 60-vote threshold for the first time ever. is that what you wanted? >> well, first of all, i hope you are right, lou, because the last time i heard, senator collins was going to support senator hagel. if you are right, that makes a difference in where we are today. i want to correct something that you said, of course, you were quoting senator reid. this is not the first time in history this has happened. it happens all the time. on the floor today in the senate, i talked about kathleen sebelius. she did it, the same exact thing happened, and when harry reid, back on the republican side, he -- one of them that he demanded to have a 60-vote threshold. john bryson, secretary of commerce, he was required to have a 60-vote. this is not a bill buster, but saying you have to file cloture in order to get this on the floor
knowledge, understanding the environment in which you are operating, communication and motivational skills, they are challenging, but they are in powering, rock-solid integrity, unusual determination, perseverance and perseverance. as you might guess, a great admirer of dr. rice, not quite as much as moamar ghadaffi. i don't have the scrapbook. [laughter] [applause] but i do have an enormous regard for dr. rice and i am jury pleased that she is here to do her formal introductions and i would like to invite the ambassador cobb to the stage. [applause] >> good morning everybody. thank you, president shalala, and my life for those nice comments. before i introduce condoleezza rice, i want to share with all of you if favoritism that i have, a bias that i have come and this is that i have a strong affinity for smart, strong, powerful, successful and charismatic leaders. as evidence of that -- [applause] as evidence of that, i have been married to one of those lease for 52 years. [applause] but a second evidence of that i had the pleasure to chair the search committee for the university of miami
closest ally. but refusing the pipeline and not building it would have zero effect on the environment. canadians stumbled on the largest reserve of shale oil around. they're the saudi arabia of shale. they are not going to keep it in the ground if we don't input it. it will go to china. say said so. it has zero effect on the climate, global warming whatever you want. the fact that obama is still mulling over there -- i understand last year he wanted to hold the left wing base. he wanted re-election. but now? after he has won re-election? it shows how -- if he refuses it, which i think is possible, it will show how partisan considerations way outweigh the national interest. it would be shocking. >> bret: secretary kerry, now secretary of state, said an announcement will come in the near term saying it won't be long. near term is what he said, juan. how do you think it will go? >> i think they are leaning toward approving it. i think it's a real disappointment for that is the case for so many people, young people who pour in to town over the weekend to proto protest this. they are conce
on the mind the security environment of china. >> okay. so i think we will leave it there, but we appreciate your insight your experience. that was a former south korean foreign minister joining us on the line. spelling out exactly what could happen over the next couple days. we did touch on it there, the role that china could play. the united states will be looking toward beijing to take a leadership role because of the influence that the chinese have over their closest friends, the north koreans. but right now we will say good-bye to our viewers in the united states. but for everyone else here at cnn international, we'll continue on with our coverage of this breaking news story. let's go to matthew chance who is live in beijing. for more on this, it is the chinese new year holiday. the place is closed down, you can shoot a cannon down the main street of beijing and not hit anybody. when can we expect something to come out of the government there? >> it's very difficult to say. >> a war in the gop. between donald trump calling karl rove a total loser and the dualing responses to the state o
environment? >> no, i don't think cruz is the symbol of a deeper problem. i think senator cruz, you know, you hear whispers about this that he's rubbing some people the wrong way. and by the way, these whispers are coming from other republicans as well as democrats. it's by bipartisan, but that is more of the hey, you're the new guy, you know, why don't you learn the ropes here and play by a more civil set of rules? but i don't think -- i think that's -- i do think on the senate side, i'm with senator coburn. there really is more at least a friendlier atmosphere. senators actually -- bipartisan senators actually go to lunch together. >> you need to remember how uncivil i was supposedly accused of being when i got here when i took on ted stevens and arlen specter. there's no change. you work your way into the senate. you build relationships, and then you work bipartisanly. >> let me just say, i mean, i've known you for a long time, tom. you were uncivil. and then you grew a beard and you've become an elder statesman of sorts. >> elder is the only correct word that could be associated with me.
% of business owners that were surveyed identified the current environment as a bad time to expand and political uncertainty topped the list for the reasons not to attempt economic growth. lee, a resident of muskogee, oklahoma, and president of acme corporation, said a lot of small businesses had to go in debt to stay afloat. he said now they can't make the money they need to to pay down debts due in large part the environment the government has created. i joined a small group of members in congress. i have faced unprecedented difficulties ensuring my business succeeded. i step on the floor of the united states house of representatives with a firsthand understanding how high the hurdles are for a business to succeed and just simply jump over. last month when president obama was sworn into his second term, i was reminded of something he said four years ago in his first inauguration. the president said, "the question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small but whether it works, whether it helps families finds a job at a decent wage, care they can afford or retirement tha
, the environment would be destroyed, the world would come to an end by us building that pipeline. you know, we're multiple decades past. it's worked very well. there haven't been those disasters that people claimed. but on top of that, i know my friend from louisiana mentioned the environmental impact, and, you know, that it makes sense, the pipeline is the safest way to move oil but on top of that, you have a choice and the senator from north dakota made it very clear, that is you get the -- to refine it in china or the u.s. i don't know about anybody here but i would bet we all agree between the environmental standards, we have a better environmental record than china does in refinery and refining of oil products. so it makes sense for us to do it here. on top of that, i know and, again, from alaska which people travel there not just for the jobs and opportunity but the beauty of alaska. we have more visitors who want to see the pipeline, to visit the pipeline. when i went down on a rafting trip you're in nowhere land. unbelievable beauty but one of the last things you see when you come down
to thank our chairman on the environment and public works committee, chairman boxer, for the briefing she held today with a number of scientists, including one who spoke specifically about the human health effects that we can see from climate change. climate change is threatening to erode the improvements in air quality that we have achieved through the clean air act. e.p.a. enforced emissions reductions have led to a decline in the number and severity of bad air days in the united states. these are the days that -- i know the presiding officer is familiar with because i'm sure they happen in connecticut as well as in rhode island -- where the air quality is so poor that it's unhealthy for sensitive individuals -- the elderly, infants, people with breathing difficulties -- to be outdoors. even healthy people are urged to limit their activities when out of doors. in rhode island, about 12% of children and 11% of adults suffer from asthma. both are higher than the national average. our rhode island public transit authority runs free buses on bad ozone days to try to keep car traffic down be
of 43% trust republicans with gun policy. on the issue of the environment, 55% trust president obama more. foreign policy, it is 51% to 37%. theresa, nevada. caller: regarding president obama using executive orders to go around the republicans in the house, i am all for it. i am aware that this is a two- party democracy and we need republicans to be reasonable working party, but they have not been. the president has no choice but to go around them. john boehner has walked away. i am frustrated and the country is frustrated, other democrats are frustrated and scared. i am scared of the things they're willing to do to our country. he is doing what he has to do. i am all for his proposals, all for clean energy and comprehensive immigration, i am for gun legislation. i am for all of them. i am center-left, that is progressive. i think the country is definitely going progressive. i do not understand where the republicans want to obstruct and go with their small mindedness and small government proposals that they think that they can push through on the american people that i do not think a
dialogue about communities and their work to promote better emotional health and creating environments for young people and their families to feel comfortable asking for help. and i'm counting on america's doctors to help lead these community conversations. the care you provide for your patience will always be your first job. but today there are many other ways for doctors to make a difference in peoples lives. starting contributing to the transformation over health care system. we have made great progress in the last few years. now i look for to working on the progress and creating a health system that patients, doctors and this country deserve. thank you all for what you do each and every day. [applause] >> when edith wilson's husband, president woodrow wilson suffered a stroke in office, her role as first lady changed. i myself have made a single decision to grant the disposition of public affairs. film decision that was mine was what was important and what was not come at a very important decision of when to present matters to my husband. >> c-span's new series first ladies come in
underground environment between the north korean, iranian, russian, pakistani scientists and in dealing of nuclear technology. i think that's a very, very dangerous element to this. jon: how do we stop that? >> well the problem is we have very little room left with north korea. we've almost, gotten to the point where we kind of learned to live with this problem and the danger there of course, there are certain people in the administration saying if we can do that with them, certainly we can live with iranian nuclear program. i don't know that, there is not an easy answer to it. jon: it is one thing to live with a north korea that has maybe a nuclear bomb or two. but a nuclear, i'm sorry a north korea that has an icbm capable of reaching the united states, and a nuclear warhead, that's a different thing entirely. >> certainly. the north koreans are on the verge of putting together a usable weapon on top of a long-range missile that can reach just about any city on earth. you talk about how we become accustomed to it. the problem is the north koreans have unstable militant regime. they ha
in a hollow army. today the global environment is the most insert nicene in my 36 years of service. it's unpredictable and dynamic. we simply don't know when we'll have to deploy soldiers to fight egad. but history tells us that we will. we owe it to them to ensure they have the proper resources to be ready when needed. the fiscal outlook, which the u.s. army faces in fiscal year 13 is dire and to my knowledge unprecedented. in addition to the 170 billion in cuts to the army that it could budget control act of 2011, the combination of the continuing resolution, a shortfall -- excuse me, a shortfall in overseas contingency operation funds for afghanistan in the sequester in fiscal year 2013 has resulted in a 17, $18 billion shortfall to the operation and maintenance accounts. as well as an additional $6 cut to other programs. all of this will come in the remaining seven months of this year. the fiscal year at her teen fiscal situation was grave and immediate readiness impacts on all fours is not serving in an order for and korea. the impacts which will have a significant impact willing
and enjoyable learning environment for students and we've seen it in our family. our youngest daughter followed her older sister to kansas state university, now a college in vet nature medicine, another area that kansas state university is so highly regarded is the study of animal science. k-state is the western border of the animal science corridor, the eastern corridor, the university of missouri. from west to east, this corridor, the animal science corridor is bounded by the research scientists and educators and stkaols that increase the -- and schools that increase the likelihoods that americans are going to have nutrition, be well fed and a safe food supply. it is an honor to may pa*eu -- pay tribute to those at kansas state university, to make sure it remains a place of higher education and learning in our state, but also to make certain that kansas state university, manhattan, kansas, is always that place called home, where students from across our state and around the globe feel like they found a family and a place to learn and improve their lives and to make certain that they contribut
environment that would get the economy growing. if you want wages to grow -- what we've done to the middle class has been devastating. immigration will be one thing we will hopefully get to an honest understanding of the policy and the facts. you opened with a comment about the president's administration. a friend of mine admits the president that promise to be the most transparent and open to not turn out that way. i have not heard members of the left just being brutal, "you promised open government and sunlight into the workings and you did just the opposite." this is an interesting conversation. the left was brutal to the previous administration on guantanamo bay, extradition, the use of drones. that same left is almost mute when this president has gone further and broken his promises. host: speaker boehner held a press conference yesterday and said the house would not pass any sequester bills until the senate does. the speaker was tired of having legislation die. guest: we have spent two years negotiating with ourselves. we sit there and wait for the president to deliver an honest budg
with the first round of this process. the technology we are talking about, the threat environment we're talking about is too dynamic. there will be innovation and opportunity that comes along as well as folks work on this. we need an approach that can constantly improve by adapting. like we have seen in other areas this collaborative structure we set up to generate the framework can be the basis of support for this ongoing process and i think will be essential when we approach this effort in that spirit. today we are at the beginning of the beginning and what i would like to do is finish by asking for your help. this is about teamwork, this is about working together. for the framework to be effected we need to begin to engage and work together. today, on the web site, we posed a series of questions that will soon be published formally and the request for information to the public to solicit input on both the framework and the framework process. i would encourage all of you to take a look at those and begin to engage with us immediately on fat. additionally, we will be hosting a series of worksh
environment then. the average cost of a new home is $24,000. a first-class stamp is 5 cents. gas was 33 cents a gallon. in the 1960s, americans did not personal computers in their homes. today we live in an electronic age. today we are educating children for jobs that have not yet been created, using technologies that have not yet been invented. today we operate a technology driven market economy and we need a modern tax system. our tax reform proposal is revenue neutral and budget control. i know there are organizations that want to tax my services at the overall goal of growing government. these organizations want to spend our tax dollars for more government programs. that is not what mr. brascan phone and that is not what our plan is about. our goal is a better business tax climate that will create more high-paying jobs and more rewarding careers for sons and daughters. we need a tax climate that rewards middle-class families for their hard work. in the next two days, i will have legislation introduced that provides alternative options for eliminating many business sales tax exemptions tha
is managing director of resources and environment at the gao. cathleen berrick is managing director of homeland security and justice issues that the gao. philip herr of infrastructure issues at the gao. orice williams brown is managing director of financial markets, an area particular concerns in committee investment at the gao. and mr. david powner is managing systems at the gao. i'm now going to ask about to stand because if you're going to help the general come you may very well be a witness. would you please raise your right hand and pursuant to the committee roasts, please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear or affirm the testimony about to give up the truth, whole truth and nothing but the truth? let the record reflect the witnesses answered in the affirmative. normally we have the five-minute clock. for your reference will have it. if you've an overcoming of the whole show today. sachin come you recognize. >> thank you, mr. chairman. wing commander cummings, members of the committee, i'm pleased to be invited today to talk about the high-risk list the day. we do the
request an immediate end to my solitary confinement and ask to be in a unit in an open prison environment where inmates are allowed outside of their cell also for no lens 14 hours a day. i have been in solitary confinement in the u.s. since february 8th 1995 with no end in sight. i further ask not to be in handcuffs or leg irons when moved outside my cell, end quote. he reportedly claims his due process under the law is being violated because he has no chance to get out of solitary confinement despite 15 years of good behavior in prison. the lawsuit reportedly claims his time in solitary confinement has led to, quote, severe psychological trauma. no comment, though, jenna on the psychological trauma he caused to the families of six killed, and more than a thousand injured in the bombing he plotted along with al-qaida's help. back to you. jenna: fair point there to bring up. julie thank you. jon: a disturbing u.n. report detailing the rice in human rights abuses across war torn syria. according to the findings both government and rebel forces are guilty of war crimes there and the fighting
in this environment. we had to raise them because of the acuity of an economic crisis. we now have an operating balance budget for the first time in a decade. california's beginning to click back. do not count us out. >> right. you know, though, gavin, though, you have always been straightforward and i've always respected you a great deal. you're a progressive politician, but you understand what it takes to bring small businesses to california. you've been concerned about high tax rates in california for a long time. >> yeah. >> and you're exactly right. whether it's rick perry who we've made a lot of fun of over the past year. you talk about rick scott. they are obsessed with bringing jobs back to their states. and it worked. what does california do? what does new york do? what does connecticut do? what do these states do that have this high tax burden and also have a lot of debt to pay off? how do they balance that with staying competitive for the next decade? >> well, the most important thing these states do is what california and new york, to degree have done, and that's deal with solvency.
health care environment run by the federal government in the united states. >> right. >> peter: what do people do to respond? >> you know, i actually get asked a lot. people come up to me, oh, the government did x, fill in the blank, whatever it might be. can we sue them? the answer most of the time is no, because most of what they do is addressed in elections. you don't like what they're doing, vote differently and show up and vote and not everybody does, of course. but there are a lot of times -- i mean, this is our second lawsuit with the epa where they're breaking the law. while this has been a both republican and democrat phenomenon in the past, we've never seen an administration so aggressive about it. we walk through example after example of how bigger government, federal government, is breaking the law over and over and how states are pushing back. but you asked about individuals. there are times when the state cannot step in, where it takes an individual person or an individual company to actually fight back and other americans count on those people to do that. but for a lot of
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)